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Finding and Using Images: Captioning & Citing Images

Is this a Figure or a Table?

There are two types of materials you can insert into your assignment that can help your audience better understand what you are presenting: Figures and Tables.

Every figure and table reproduced (copied/pasted) in your written assignment should be captioned and/or cited.

Caption: A description that identifies the image and credits the source  (Title/Description. Credit Line.)

Citation: A description that appears in a note or in your works cited. (Creator's Name. Title/Description. Year. Source.)

Figures

Figures: Information represented in the form of photos, drawings, images, graphs, charts or maps

          

Captioning a Figure

Practices:

  • Captions are placed BELOW the image.
  • Include: (1) a description of the figure/image, and (2) a source credit

     

                                          

Fig. 3. Calculation of non-dimensional stress intensity

factors. Modified after Lin et al., 1993 mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn

   Fig. 1. "Kashi, puppy beagle :)” by “Capture99.” Licensed under a  Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC-BY2.0). Accessed 26 Feb 2018. https://www.flickr.com/photos/99543037@N05/9448115112

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

Citing Figures and Tables in your Bibliography

Citing images from Google: 

Tip: After doing a Google image search, click on the image of interest, then click on the "Visit" icon on the right to obtain information on the photo.

Citing an image from Flickr:

Capture99. "Kashi, Puppy Beagle". 24 July, 2013. Online image. Flikr. 26 Feb 2008. www.flickr.com/photos/99543037@N05/9448115112

​Citing an image from Getty Images:

Getty Images. (2016). Giant Pandas play on snow at Hangzhou Zoo [Photograph], Retrieved from: (https://www.gettyimages.com/event/giant-pandas-play-after-snow-in-hangzhou-601288643#/two-giant-pandas-play-on-snow-at-hangzhou-zoo-on-january-21-2016-in-picture-id506189554)

Citing figures and tables from scholarly sources:

Citing a chart from a journal article: 

Roy, Debanjan Guha, T. N. Singh, and J. Kodikara. "Influence of joint anisotropy on the fracturing behavior of a sedimentary rock." Engineering Geology 228 (2017): figure 3.

Citing a table from a journal article: 

Roy, Debanjan Guha, T. N. Singh, and J. Kodikara. "Influence of joint anisotropy on the fracturing behavior of a sedimentary rock." Engineering Geology 228 (2017): table 2.

 

Tables

Tables: Information compiled in the form of rows and columns

Captioning a Table

Practices: 

  • Captions are placed ABOVE the table.
  • Include: (1) a table number and (2) a description of the information contained

Example: 

 Table 2. Asymptotic fracture energy and SCB Diameter as determined by the scaling laws.                                                                                                            

 

Notes

(1) If you slightly modified a figure taken from another source, you must include the words "Adapted from" or "Modified after" followed by the source. (see Fig.3.)

(2) When reproducing figures and tables, you must become familiar with any stated rules in their "Terms of Use," or "Image Credits," section. 

(3) If no information is provided on the image, then create your own title, describe the format in brackets, state the year ("n.d" for "no date"), and include a retrieval statement:

Example:

Vitamin C [Digital Image]. (n.d.). Retrieved from  https://www.mensfitness.com/nutrition/supplements/supplement-guide-vitamin-c