Skip to main content

ENGL 1030: Composition & Rhetoric

This guide will help students enrolled in ENGL 1030 find resources to complete the major assignments

Path for Others to Use Creative Works

When you think about having to cite sources, it is often in the context of how to avoid plagiarism. However, there is also another practical purpose of citing sources, which is to provide a path for others to find and use works by others. 

 

You will want to provide a way for others to see where you used images, sounds, videos you used. You will need to think about how you will give rhetorically appropriate credit to the creators.

Suggestions of Where to Give Attributions

Location of Attribution How to Include
Visual Presentation Next to text or below it and a full list of citations at the end of the presentation Using the in-text format when attributing next to text or below it and a list of citations at the end
Video End of video Credits instead of Works Cited
Podcast Throughout your work Verbal attributions and/or provide a way for your audience to access the information
Website Throughout your work Hyperlink instead of citations

 

How to Cite or Give Attribution

Citing Open Media 

When citing openly licensed assets (images, videos, sounds, etc.), you have two different options to use. Openly licensed assets include assets with Creative Commons licenses or are in the Public Domain.

 

Option 1 - Using the Title, Author, License format

Attribution using this form includes displaying the title, author, source, and license type. Another acceptable format is to include the title, author, and license type. Below is an ideal example. 

image of Lake Hartwell

"Lake Hartwell Clemson" by Srikant Mishra from Pixabay is licensed under CC0 (Public Domain)
 (Links to an external site.)

Option 2 - Providing a Regular Citation

1. First, create a regular MLA Citation for Images found on a Website.

Format Structure for Citing Digital Images

Creator's Last name, First name. "Title of the digital image." Title of the website, First name Last name of any contributors, Version (if applicable), Number (if applicable), Publisher, Publication date, URL.

 

2. Second, add the license type for open media. This is where you want to pay attention to the type of Creative Commons license the media has. You can use the acronyms (CC BY SA) or use the text version (CC Attribution - Share Alike).

Format Structure:

Creator's Last name, First name. "Title of the digital image." Title of the website, First name Last name of any contributors, Version (if applicable), Number (if applicable), Publisher, Publication date, URL. License type.

 

Keep in mind the following:

  • For items in the public domain, just add "Public Domain" as the license
  • For resources that are allowed for educational use only, just add "Educational use allowed" where the license information is located 

 

Other Resources to Help You Cite:

  • MLA at Purdue Owl - Find how to cite Tweets, blog posts, and other media, as well as formatting for articles and books.
  • MLA Handbook at Clemson Libraries - Clemson Libraries own a print copy of the MLA Handbook. You cannot check it out, but you can use it while at the Services Desk in Cooper Library. 

Manage Your Citations

Build your own personal database of citations and create a bibliography automatically in seconds with this free citation manager